Skip to content

A stroll along the Rio Sor looking for butterflies

The Rio Sor or Sor Mañón is a small, tranquil river which flows between the provinces of A Coruña and Lugo, in Galicia, NW Spain.It flows north into the Bay of Biscay.

Rio Sor – shallow water
Rio Sor

The Rio Sor is about 50 km long and it is possible to walk much of it (if not all of it, I’m not sure) along well maintained paths beside the river.

It is a remarkably beautiful place and it never ceases to amaze me how few people one comes across, even in the height of the summer. On this occasion, in mid June, I did not come across anybody all afternoon.

There are many Speckled Wood butterflies all along the river, often perching in sun spots, which they defend against intruders.

Speckled wood (Pararge aegeria)

Slugs also seem to thrive here!

The black slug (Arion ater)

In this region of Galicia, there are many abandoned farms or homesteads. Crumbling stone buildings surrounded by unused meadows.

Abandoned farmhouse
Uncut meadow near the Rio Sor

There were some gorgeous little orange Meadow fritillaries flying around and perching on flowers; trying to warm up in the weak sunshine.

Meadow fritillary (Melitaea parthenoides)
Meadow fritillary (Melitaea parthenoides)

I was surprised to come across an incredibly worn Camberwell Beauty, presumably a survivor from the previous summer?

Camberwell beauty (Nymphalis antiopa)

There were also plenty of brimstones nectaring on dog-rose’s along the river.

Brimstone (Gonepteryx rhamni) male

I also saw a peacock and a marsh fritillary. Later in the year there will be many white admirals along the river, but it was still a bit early for them.

As well as ferns, there is an abundance of mosses, lichens and liverworts  Some of the mosses are quite large.

Mosses

There are many quiet and unspoilt places in this world where nature carries on as it always has. In fact nature thrives where man moves out and leaves a space. We need more places like this in the world. It is the only way we will survive.

rcannon992 View All

I am a retired entomologist with a background in quarantine pests and invasive invertebrates. I studied zoology at Imperial College (University of London) and did a PhD on the population dynamics of a cereal aphid (Metopolophium dirhodum) in the UK. I spent 5 years with the British Antarctic Survey studing cold hardiness of Antarctic invertebates and 17 years with the Food and Environment Research Agency. My main interests now are natural history, photography, painting and bird watching.

2 thoughts on “A stroll along the Rio Sor looking for butterflies Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

spineless

Research blog of Renee Rossini

Notes on a Spanish Valley

Award-winning blog - Living in rural Andalucia

The Art of Blogging

For bloggers who aspire to inspire

walter sanford's photoblog

Showcasing some of my digital photography and videography.

Katatrepsis

Science, skepticism and dragonflies

Paths Unwritten

Lost Cities. Forgotten Spaces. Curious Places.

Q13 FOX News

Seattle and Western Washington's source for breaking news, weather, and sports. Home of Washington’s Most Wanted and the Seattle Seahawks.

Spanish Linguist

a linguist writes about Spanish

Ray Cannon's nature notes

Every picture tells a story

Too Lazy To Weed

The not so ordinary wildlife of an ordinary (but scruffy) garden

Nature etc.

Books, birds and tales from the wild

Juha Lappalainen photography

The way I see the world around me...

Wandering with Butterflies

and other Lepidoptera

Andrew Szopa-Comley

Exploring the natural world.

Ewa Ludwiczak

Watercolour Painting and Illustration

%d bloggers like this: